Jump to content

Awards

Combat and Commendation Medals

  1. Distinguished Service Cross (DSC)

    History  

    The Distinguished Service Cross was established by President Woodrow Wilson on January 2, 1918. General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Forces in France, had recommended that recognition other than the Medal of Honor, be authorized for the Armed Forces of the United States for service rendered, in like manner, to that awarded by the European Armies. The request for establishment of the medal was forwarded from the Secretary of War to the President in a letter dated December 28, 1917. The Act of Congress establishing this award (193-65th Congress) dated July 9, 1918 is contained in Title 10 United States Code (USC) 3742. The establishment of the Distinguished Service Cross was promulgated in War Department General Order No. 6, dated January 12, 1918.  

    Prerequisites  

    The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army (and previously, the United States Army Air Forces). It is awarded for extraordinary heroism:  

    While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States;  

    While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or  

    While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.  

    Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy and Marine Corps, and Coast Guard when operating under the authority of the Department of the Navy) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force). 

  2. Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM)

    History
    The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall only be awarded to officers of the Armed Forces of the United States whose exceptional performance of duty and contributions to national security or defense have been at the highest levels. Such officers have direct and ultimate responsibility for a major activity or program that significantly influences the policies of the U.S. Government. Only under the most unusual circumstances will the DDSM be awarded as an impact award for outstanding TDY achievement. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period.
    Prerequisites
    The Defense Distinguished Service Medal (DDSM) shall be awarded only to officers or Senior NCO's who have rendered distinguished meritorious service in a position of enormous responsibility. The DDSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally distinguished service, and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period of 10 years in time of service in one tour.
  3. Silver Star (SS)

    History
    The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: "No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations." Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.
    Prerequisites

    The Silver Star is the third-highest military combat decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Armed Forces. It is awarded for gallantry in action:

    While engaged in action against an enemy of the United States; While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. Actions that merit the Silver Star must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not merit award of the meet Medal of Honor or a Service Cross (Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross).

  4. Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM)

    History
    The Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM) is the second highest award bestowed by the Department of Defense. Awarded in the name of the Secretary of Defense, the award is presented to members of the U.S. Armed Forces who perform "superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility." Created on February 6th, 1976 by President Gerald R. Ford's Executive Order 11904, it is typically awarded only to senior officers of the Flag and General Officer grade.
    Prerequisites
    The Defense Superior Service Medal (DSSM) shall be awarded only to officers or NCO's who have rendered superior service in a position of enormous responsibility. The DSSM is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally dedicated service, and to honor an individual's accomplishments over a sustained period of 5 years in time of service in one tour.
  5. Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC)

    History
    Awarded for heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight.
    Prerequisites
    Recipient must distinguish themselves in support of operations by showing "great heroism or extraordinary action" in an aerial flight as Pilot or Crew Chief. May be awarded for a single action or series of actions that go above and beyond the normal duties of an aviator.
  6. Soldier's Medal (SM)

    History
    The Soldier's Medal is awarded to any person while serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States distinguished himself or herself by heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy.
    Prerequisites
    Awarded to soldiers selected as Soldier of the Quarter.
  7. Bronze Star (BSM)

     

    History
    General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen’s morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.
    Prerequisites

    Bronze Star Medal

    (ref AR600-8-22)

    DA Form 638 Instructions
    Enclosure 1. Narrative
    Citation Template
    BSM Citation Examples
    Non-Combat BSM Narrative Examples
    Bronze Star Medal w/ V Device Citation Example
    The Bronze Star Medal is awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Army of the United States distinguished himself or herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight, in connection with military operations against an armed enemy; or while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. 

    The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded for meritorious achievement or meritorious service according to the following:

    Awards may be made to recognize single acts of merit or meritorious service. The lesser degree than that required for the award of the Legion of Merit must nevertheless have been meritorious and accomplished with distinction.

    Award may be made to each member of the Armed Forces of the United States who has been cited in orders or awarded a certificate for exemplary conduct in ground combat against an armed enemy. For this purpose, an award of the Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge is considered as a citation in orders.

Qualifications

  1. Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB)

    History
    The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a special skills badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB), it is a completely different award: while the CIB is awarded to infantrymen for participation in ground combat, the EIB is presented for completion of a course of testing designed to demonstrate proficiency in infantry skills. The EIB was first created in October 1943. Currently, it is awarded to U.S. Army personnel who hold infantry or special forces military occupational specialties. To be awarded the EIB, the soldier must complete a number of prerequisites and pass a battery of graded tests on basic infantry skills.
    Prerequisites
    The Expert Infantryman Badge is awarded to Soldiers who successfully reattend 30 training courses (B.I.T, A.I.T, C.Q.B) in the 160th Special Operations Regiment.
  2. Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB1)

    History
    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.
    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than 25 times and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge
  3. Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB2)

    History
    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.
    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than 50 times, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  4. Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB3)

    History
    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.
    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than 75 times, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  5. Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB4)

    History
    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.
    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than 100 times, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.
  6. Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB5)

    History
    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.
    Prerequisites
    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than 150 times, and came out victorious during an official operational mission. Subsequent awards are denoted by 1 silver star per additional award, attached to the top of the badge.

Devices

  1. Appurtenance - Numerals



     

     

×
×
  • Create New...